Why I cried when my child had a meltdown on a busy train

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Isaac was so excited. He had watched so many trains come and go from the busy platform while he flapped, clapped and laughed at the doors opening and closing and the whistle blow as each train pulled away. He loves trains and even more so when he gets to ride on them.

Our train was due next so I held his hand and gathered up our bags. I knelt down beside him and told him we needed coach B and we would sit at a table. I was unsure if he understood as at 8 he has complex autism, learning difficulties and a brain tumour. I had already prepared him though and just the day before we had been on the same train for the journey down. He had loved that journey and I was sure he would love this one too.

But as I helped him over the large gap and headed for our booked seats on the busy train I had no idea of the huge meltdown I was about to face.

The seats we booked were not where they should have been and instead of a table of four we were instead booked to sit on a row of two with the other two seats behind. No amount of explaining would work and Isaac sat down in the aisle of the busy train and screamed.

He screamed and he screamed. He banged his head and bit himself. He shook and kicked his legs. He could not cope with such a simple change as a different seat. It was awful.

He was scared. I was scared. He was crying, his sister was crying and I was crying inside. It was like a scene from a horror movie with all eyes on the train on me and my son and I had no idea what to do. My son was a danger to himself and others and was causing an obstruction on a busy train that was unable to stop.

I sat on the floor beside my traumatised son and tried to calm him as a member of the train crew approached us. Through the noise and distress of my son and his sisters crying I somehow managed to explain to the assistant what the problem was.

Immediately she did everything she could to help. She checked every carriage on that train for a feee table but there was none available. I tried to see if Isaac would sit on some fold out seats near a window or perhaps even stand at the door. I had told him we would be sitting at a table together and that was all his brain could process. One little change had disturbed him so much his body was in crisis.

And then a stranger offered to help. With tears in her own eyes she came down to where I was and said she could see the distress of my son and would he like her table seat. She was not angry or frustrated, or even annoyed; she showed compassion and gave up her own seat to see my child happy.
I thanked her and we sat at her table and immediately Isaac began to calm down. Everyone was looking at me and I was waiting for a stare or rude comment or cheeky remark. We got none of that. All I saw were people moved by what this lady did and by seeing a child with special needs so upset.

I was so touched but more was to come.

IMG_1108As the train employee returned she handed me a bag. She apologised for the booking mistake, gifted us a whole bag of food from the buffet trolley and called ahead to our destination and booked assistance for us. She then asked what Isaac enjoyed doing and when I said he loves pressing buttons she lead him through the entire train and let him press buttons at doors, toilets and even on her ticket machine.

IMG_1107She turned Isaac’s distress to utter delight. As I walked through the carriage and past the passenger who had give up her seat I looked at her and cried. She too has eyes filled with emotion as she watched my son laugh as the toilet door opened when he pressed the button.

Yesterday I witness kindness on a scale that changed me. I saw not only autism awareness but autism acceptance and compassion. Instead of stares I saw smiles. Instead of rudeness I saw understanding.

My child is not badly behaved or spoiled. He was highly distressed over a simple change that I had no control over. He was told something would happen and that didn’t go to plan. He could not voice what was upsetting him and he was scared we were on the wrong train since we had no table.

I cried when my son had a meltdown on a busy train yesterday because I hate seeing him so anxious and scared, but I also cried at the actions of complete strangers and simple acts of kindness that I will never ever forget.

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I found this bag this morning as I was sorting though our luggage. It reminded me again of yesterday and why I cried when my son had a meltdown on a busy train.

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Never before has a tray of pasta meant so much to me

imageNever before has a tray of pasta meant so much to me

I could so easily write a negative post. Life is anything but a field of roses right now but right in the midst of pain and struggles a little kindness, a hint of love, or even a tray of pasta can change things!

This post is dedicated to the manager of a pizza restaurant local to me. I will be printing out a copy and hand delivering it to her this week.

I need her to know that never before has a tray of pasta meant so much to me.

imageMy children are struggling. I try and disguise that but I can’t. In the last month my son has endured some difficult medical test including 24 hours of wires glued to his head:

And a few weeks later having to have anaesthetic for an MRI to identify where all his tumours are growing inside him.

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For any child these things are a real challenge but when you can not talk, have limited understanding and have a diagnosis of severe autism and neurofibromatosis these things just seem so much harder; for the child and the parents.

As well as this he has had to cope with a change of teacher at school and beginning overnight respite. He has been brave but in turn we have had to deal with some challenging behaviour.

For his twin sister these procedures and the ensuing changes to her schedule have been so upsetting and disorientating. End of term changes at school, a wobbly tooth and her friend being off school have made everything seem so much worse. This all causes one major difficulty: when stressed Naomi stops eating. Really stops eating.

Isaac loves his food. Anything edible is the highlight of his day. Among his many favourite foods are pizza, salad and garlic bread. One of the very few things his twin sister will eat is a certain pasta from a pizza restaurant.

Sometimes as a parent you do what you need to do to survive.

As much as I try to hide it it is very obvious even to a stranger that my children have struggles. Yet in this particular restaurant we always seem to be welcome.

By now you may have guessed what happened. My daughter broke her self imposed stress related fast and picked at her favourite pasta. As I took her brother up to the buffet the manager spoke to me with a smile and said she noticed my daughter only ever ate the pasta so she would go put more on ready for if she she wanted it. I wanted to hug her.

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Never before has a tray of pasta meant so much to me.

I had to say something because by now I was emotional. I sort of whispered that Naomi has autism and loves the pasta and thanked her for her kindness.

I thought nothing more of it until I went to pay and the manager said she had something for me. She handed me a bag with an entire tray of the pasta in!

She had no idea of our story. She had no idea the stress we had all been through and the daily struggles we face. She had no idea that that pasta was pretty much all that was keeping my daughter out of hospital.

A tray of pasta.

Never before has a simple tray of pasta meant so much to me, or my daughter.

You don’t need to know someone’s struggles to be kind. You don’t need to know their story to show love. The smallest of gifts can impact another life so much. Be kind. Show compassion.

We have of course eaten the pasta now. But the love shown to my family that day lives on.