About

I am a 30-something wife, mother and Christian living in Scotland.

I am raising twins, both of whom have special needs. My son has classic autism, severe learning difficulties, global developmental delay, pica and neurofibromatosis type 1. He is non-verbal. His twin sister has selective mutism, gross motor delay and will be assessed for autism later this year.

I have a strong faith. It took 10 years to have the children and they were born as a result of IVF after a very long journey of infertility. I have been married almost 15 years and the children are aged 4.

The children currently attend nursery but will be starting school in August 2013. They are a huge blessing to me.

I am currently a full time carer for my son but have done many jobs over the years and trained as a teacher many years ago. Life is now full of nappy changes, hospital appointments, meetings and reports but I believe I still have a voice and can use it to encourage, make you smile and share with you the story of my family. I hope you enjoy reading my blogs.

Love and blessings,
Miriam

45 thoughts on “About

  1. I am new to reading your blog, but each time I read it I am touched as you pour out your love, sadness, and hope. I have worked with an applied behavior analysis provider working with children with autism for 6 years. I also am a fellow parent and have a 1.5 year old boy. Thank you for sharing your story. I will be praying for you and your family. If you ever want someone to lend an ear please feel free to contact me. I have worked with a variety of little ones with all different behaviors and needs. God Bless you and your family.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Hi there, I just found your blog. My son Cooper has no words at age 3. No diagnosis yet…What I do know is that I NEED to find other moms that are going through the same situation because it’s too scary to do alone. I just read your About page and I am thinking I found a good spot. Looking forward to reading your posts. Thanks!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Hi Miriam. I just found your blog. Thank you for sharing your journey with us. My only child, Daniel is autistic too. Diagnosed as mildly autistic, but still, he’s left far behind as compared to “typical” children. He speaks a little (one word only). Keep on writing Miriam. Its comforting to know that there are people who is sharing the same journey. Now I dont feel alone at least. I admit that FAITH has helped me a lot in accepting my son’s condition. Its not easy at first but I’m coping from day to day. May GOD give us the strenght to be the best mommies to these kids. Im not sure if this is appropriate, but in my religion, all these special kids are called “children of heaven”. They will straight go to heaven in the next life. I hope this is true. Im proud to have one. In your case you have two. 🙂

    Hugs,
    Adia
    Malaysia

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  4. I read your blog often as I can relate to so much of it. We also have a lot in common. I have 2 year old twins(also a result of IVF). I have a 5 year old, she is non verbal with an undiagnosed condition resulting in sensory issues and behavioural problems and GDD. Incidently I am also a teacher! Would be happy to email. By the way i think you do an amazing job with your twins,

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  5. Id like to make contact – we are in v similar positions. My five year old daugther is v much like your son. ASD, GDD, LD (prob severe). Im in Scotland too and recently baptised. I read some of your posts and identfied so much with you and with how you are approaching your situation. Im fairly sane altho sleep deprived. Id just like to speak to someone in a situation like mine.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Miriam,
    Thank you for putting to words, beautifully I might add, the emotions so many of us share. The post Grieving for the Child I Haven’t Lost resonated deeply for me. I have a daughter, now 25, and I can tell you that each milestone that friends have experienced with their own children bring on the grief cycle I have become far to familiar with.
    I’d like to ask permission to modify your post with “her and she” so I can share it with family, of course I will credit you.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. I just found your blog and I am amazed at how similarly we think. I too am a parent of a child with “special needs” (a term I am just starting to be comfortable using, although not really…) and I just recently started my own blog about my journey. I can relate to so much of what you say and feel. Keep focusing on those precious moments and take care of yourself so that you can keep on doing what you need to do. Hugs from across the ocean.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Wow just came across this blog and it runs true to me! I have a non verbal 5yr old with what now have learnt is the severe end of the spectrum and all the issues that come along with it to boot! He has little understanding and we are trying to teach him PECS at the moment for his voice to others as he is a hand grabber then leads to what he wants at home, Gorgeous boy though and such a joy but have to say am so sick of reading pages and posts where nobodys kid seems as bad as mine and seem to not understand or be able to relate having a child with such severe needs, this a breath of freash air for me to read your posts because all tend to see is Autism is such a amazing gift am blessed blaa bla but in reality that isnt always the case and yes you have to grieve sometimes its bloody unfair, Owen was the 2nd child so we would not have a spolit “only child” and they would have each other play with etc as we have a very bright 8year old daughter and she now finds it very very hard, feel for her so bad she really trys with him but he does not want to know and will start slapping n hitting himself in d head even when she just enters the same room as he is in………she always asks why does Owen hate me so much cause i know he does it upsets me and is so sad and so very hard 2try and explain to anyone let alone a child of 8yrs! Truth is unless you live with this Autism day in and out then you cannot start to understand it. Its just so complex and am always still learning! Try not to think about the future and always have hope and the best we can for him for now. He is a complete joy though to look after at home mostly! Smiles and laughing from moment he opens his eyes to when he goes to sleep i just really really dont want him to grow any older just stay like this and this age forever would suit me fine!

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Truly, I am never been one to say to parents ‘have you tried this’?, how annoying that must be. But after the past two years of meeting an entire new community of young non speaking autistics who communicate through RPM with letter boards, I can’t not mention it. This is the conference that I just attended, with young adults trying so hard to let us hear their ‘voice’.

    https://growingkidstherapy.wordpress.com/2015/12/10/nonspeaking-youth-advocate-at-tash-conference-2015/

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  10. Thank you Miriam for sharing your own life experience with us.Your positive attitudes towards life is really a motivation as well as inspiration to many parents of children with special needs.. I am pretty sure that this blog will be helpful to understand the feelings and needs of children with disabilities and their parents in a better way. It can act as a useful guide in rendering quality care.Your faith is your strength and its our inspiration.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Miriam, I have no doubt that your blogs and articles released all over the internet are done with a good heart and determination to help many other parents around the world. I believe this is your aim. However I do feel that your very honest thoughts can be of harm to your children in the future. Your daughter from what you have described seems an intelligent girl, who with the correct support will aim to have her own career in the future. Many potential employers, even at the moment will do a google search on potential applicants. A quick scan of your blog may put them off. As a teenager potential bullies may read your blogs and articles. Hopefully in the future, as an adult your son may be able to read these articles too. I want you to honestly think about what you are writing. To be constantly compared to a child without autism will break his heart. Do what you are doing, if you must, if you really feel it will help others and be good therapy for yourself, but please, please, for both your children, change your name, stop using their photos, stop taking away their personal privacy from them. This isn’t just your story, it is theirs too, and they dont need all the details of their issues plastered all over the internet

    God Bless

    Jillian

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  12. I have been reading about your beautiful children and your dedication to helping them grow and develop in their own ways and on their own timetables for a few years now. I am delighted with every step forward and send you virtual hugs when yet another challenge arises. Stay strong and keep posting — you are a gifted writer!

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  13. Hello Miriam, I stumbled upon your blog today. You post about the tray of pasta made me cry. It’s a simple gesture, but such a thoughtful and powerful one!

    You probably have had a number of therapies suggested to you, but I am going to suggest one more. I read about it in a book call the Fabric of Autism. The therapy is call HANDLE therapy — holistic approach to neuro-development learning effiency. The founder of the therapy, Judith Bluestone, had autism.

    While my understand of most autism treatment is limited, I understand that this one is not about getting the child to conform to some societal norm and repetitive training. Handle therapy looks for reasons behind a child’s struggles and finds the issues behind them and strengthen those areas. I think the book might be worth a read. It looks like there are a few practitioners in Scotland as well.
    http://www.handle.org/providers

    Warm wishes,

    Vivian

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  15. Miriam, I’m a former teacher and 1-1 for children with autism. I’m now a holistic therapy tutor and I do a lot of workshops and therapies for children with autism and their families, and am studying for a postgrad cert in working with people on the autistic spectrum. So although I haven’t a child with the condition, I can really relate to what you’re experiencing, so many parents have told me exactly this. Thank you for sharing and helping so many other parents to see they’re not alone. I just hope that one day schools will be more accepting and supportive. Thinking of you and your family, and thank you again. x

    Liked by 1 person

  16. i get your blog .i, have aspergers…i do a blog details below ..getting a diagnosis does NOT

    mean VERY VERY SADLY .the right kind HELP ..try your local M.P SUPPORT GROUPS

    MARK

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  17. Hello Miriam,

    I found your blog on facebook and I read your article about what it’s like to not be able to leave a child who has autism unattended. I don’t have children of my own, but I can feel your struggle through your incredibly heartfelt writing. Not only that, but I can feel the unconditional love you have for your son throughout. I have a childhood friend who is low functioning autistic, non-verbal and sometimes violent and it is stressful going to dinners and simply walking in public to make sure he won’t hurt anybody or become too loud. His mother makes it through the night by believing she was chosen fora reason to take care of him and nurture him, and that is true; not everyone can do it. It takes incredible love and strength and you have the compassion in you! I only found your blog just a few minutes ago but I am here to stay and support all your wonderful writing. Never ever lose hope or faith, which everyone needs, and people like me are always here for you.. just look at all these wonderful comments! I hope you have a fantastic day today, as it was yesterday and will be tomorrow ❤

    With love, Kira

    Liked by 1 person

  18. Hi Miriam,
    Lovely blog! I thought you might like watching an animation I made to raise autism awareness among non-autistic children. I hope I can get the school’s attention so it reaches the right audience. I’d love to hear what you think!

    Liked by 2 people

  19. Miriam, so glad to have found your blog! I am a teacher in the US who has one student who sounds so much like your precious son. ( I’ll give him the pseudo name of John) He has severe seizures and PICA. He is non verbal and constantly seeks after vestibular input as well as oral sensory input. Joh chews on and eats everything. Just in the last two weeks, he has swallowed 2 therapy balls belonging to one of his peers. John is a medical anomaly….swallowing things so large with no effort and with incredible speed. I am trying to find an item large enough for him to receive oral sensory input but something he cannot bite off or swallow. Have you found anything like that for your son?

    Liked by 1 person

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  21. I live in Australia. If I could help, I would. I have 20 years experience in this area. It would help me too, I want to share my knowledge. Do not hesitate to ask. Given freely no strings ☺

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