An autism nativity

angel

An autism nativity

If everyone in the Christmas story was on the spectrum…

Let’s start with Mary and Joseph. The story goes that they were not married.
Now that is easy to understand if they are on the spectrum! They would not like change for a start. And the social anxiety surrounding planning and attending a wedding would be very daunting for someone with autism. As bride and groom they would be the centre of attention and be forced into a social situation they would find overwhelming. The sounds, smells and traditions would all be so confusing. And then Mary would have the stress of changing her name. So it makes sense to not get married.

An angel appears to Mary and tells her what is going to happen. The angel even tells her what to call her baby!
Perhaps God knew how to lessen her anxiety by giving her a clear timetable of events? First become pregnant, then have a baby boy called Jesus. The angel may not have had visuals but the sensory experience of seeing an angel would sure help Mary to remember the events clearly. God even took away the anxiety of having to choose the name for her child.

Caesar Augustus wanted to list everyone in his empire.
An obvious case of someone on the spectrum needing to list and order. I wonder if he even lined them all up? Numbers were clearly his ‘thing’ and he needed to have everyone just where he wanted them.

Miracle of the Virgin birth.
If you know anyone on the spectrum you will know that sometimes the unexpected happens. Non verbal children can all of a sudden start saying words, a child who has struggled to talk in school suddenly finds the confidence to speak up, a child who has not been able to understand the concept of toilet training suddenly has a breakthrough. Never underestimate what anyone can do, especially someone with autism! Miracles happen every day.

Shepherds were guarding their sheep.
Great occupation for anyone on the spectrum! Simple routine day in and day out, solitary job and with the calming sensation of the noise of sheep, who are by nature very predictable and calm animals. They were right where they always were that night. The predictability is so reassuring for people with autism.

Angels appears to the shepherds.
After introducing a sudden sensory experience and change the first thing the angel did was lessen the shepherds anxiety. They immediately calmed them by saying it was good news they were bringing. Then they outlined a very straightforward sequence of events with enough detail to help the shepherd find the special baby. Perfect example of how to help someone with autism. Calm, reassurance and knowledge of what is ahead.

Shepherds pass on what the Angels had said.
Even after a length of time the shepherds remembered word for word what had been said to them. Exactly like so many people on the spectrum who can relay with confidence exact words from DVD’s, stories or conversations. Perhaps the shepherds even had echolalia, a very common speech issue for lots of people with autism.

Mary kept thinking.
Some people on the spectrum take longer to process things and can think things over for many months or years. Mary remembered what had happened in great detail and, although overwhelmed, could recall details in incredible accuracy, similar to many people with ASD.

The wise men see a new star.
Clearly these men were experts in their field, almost it would seem, obsessional. They knew everything there was to know about astrology in order to notice one different star and understand what it meant. Obsessional behaviour like this is very common with people diagnosed with autism.

The wise men went straight to king Herod.
Well that is protocol and one must always do exactly as the rules state! There was no thought that the king could be anything different. People with autism struggle with social imagination and just like the wise men can often continue doing things the same way they have always been done because they can not ‘imagine’ how they could be done any different.

The wise men give gifts.
Once again they did thing as protocol and rules stated. They could not imagine coming empty-handed. The gifts were given in an orderly and controlled manner even though they were presented to a young child. It was all ‘just so’ as you would expect for someone on the spectrum.

Mary and Joseph did everything God commanded.
They were very obliging, non confrontational and obedient even when asked to do things that made them uncomfortable. So much like my own daughter who is so eager to please and afraid of upsetting anyone.

Throughout the story God is the perfect example of a therapist. He has it all planned and lays out those plans to each person as he feels they need. He gives them daily schedules, sensory breaks (the shepherds travelled through the night in the dark after having seen a bright angel, Mary and Joseph get the comfort and peace of a manger after the difficult journey), and he keeps it all in order.

This may be written for fun but it does make you think. People on the autism spectrum are just ‘normal’ people like you and I, or the shepherds, or wise men. They are all important and they should all be valued by society.

As you hear the Christmas story this coming week please think about the fact that just like Mary and Joseph had a long and difficult journey to Bethlehem, some children and adults with autism will have had a long and difficult December with all the changes and stresses of Christmas. And let’s believe for some wonderful Christmas miracles of love, acceptance and support for everyone with autism, learning delays and disabilities.

Wishing you all a peaceful and blessed Christmas.

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3 thoughts on “An autism nativity

    • This pic was taken last year at her nursery nativity. She was so nervous and was very unhappy to have short sleeves. This year she was a fluffy sheep but I didn’t have a pic to share 🙂

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