A label won’t define them

Are you one of those shoppers who reads the labels before buying a product? Do you want to know how much salt it contains, whether it has any artificial products in it or even just how long a use by date it has? Or do you just recognise familiar brand labels and put them in your trolley because you know your kids will eat it? Whatever you do the label serves a purpose but without opening the product you still won’t know what it is actually like.

Autism is the same.

‘Autism’ is a label that was given officially to my son on 31st July 2012. It is a label he will have for life. Some people see his label but don’t see him. Others use the label to get a better understanding of his behaviours and tailor his education to suit his needs. Some see his label as just an excuse for anti social behaviour. Still others are frightened by his label. Many do not understand his label and a few see past his label and get to know Isaac. And even fewer are interested enough to read the small print and see the other labels he has such as global developmental delay, severe learning difficulties and neurofibromatosis type 1. 

So I thought it would be good to explain his label (his diagnosis) a little more:

Autism is a complex lifelong condition that affects how a person sees and makes sense of the world. It is a spectrum condition meaning some people are affected mildly and others more severely. There are four main areas it affects including:

social communication (Isaac can not talk or point and struggles to make his needs known. He does not use social gestures like waving or pointing or blowing kisses. He is unaware of others around him much of the time and can not read facial expressions such as knowing when someone is happy or sad. He can hit or bite as he does not know this is not a socially acceptable means of communicating)

social interaction (Isaac does not give eye contact and ignores people when they are talking to him. He has difficulty following simple instructions. If he wants to sit on a seat and someone is already on it he will sit on top of them as if they were not there. He only plays on his own. He does not understand other childrens games. He will break up a train set unaware his sister is playing with it.)

social imagination (Isaac is unable to imagine dangers exist such as moving cars on a road, or falling down a hole. He can not cope with changes to his routine because he can not ‘imagine’ doing anything differently. He can not cope with new places as he has no concept of the wider world around him. New toys stay in the boxes as he can not imagine they could be taken out. He can not imagine what another person might be thinking so can act very inappropriately. He is unable to work out what other children are playing or that a train set toy is representative of a real life train.) 

sensory issues (Isaac processes sensory information differently to others. His play is all on a sensory level and he finds great delight in water play or exploring feathers. He likes to scan things across his eye line. He hates socks and shoes on. He chews and bites everything. He prefers to have no clothes on. He likes deep pressure. He loves the detail and repetitive patterns on things. He adores straight lines.)

 

But this is only how those areas affect Isaac. Everyone with autism is so unique and the areas of difficulty can affect people in all different ways. It is very likely Isaac’s twin sister will also be diagnosed as having autism later this year. But, she can talk fluently, gives good eye contact, is socially aware and academically thriving. Yet they could both have the same label.

Because a label can not define a person. 

You have to open a tin of beans and taste them to know what they are really like. For all a washing powder label says it gets “rid of every stain known” until you try it on your childs ground in blackcurrant juice stains you will never know how good it is.

Please don’t be frightened of my childrens labels or diagnosis. And please never let it define them. They are funny, boisterous, happy, loving children who are unique in every way. Autism helps us understand them but it will never define them.

Here they are playing together with a toy kitchen. Communicating, interacting, using imagination and experiencing all sorts of sensory feedback like noise and colours and movement. Because no label can define them!

Image

 

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2 thoughts on “A label won’t define them

  1. I love them as they are. Two beautiful children with unique personalities. Society is too quick to stick labels on everything and everyone. We are all individually made in the eyes of our creator and in His image.

    Like

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